Information Net for August 12

Union Pacific Railroad Acquires Big Boy Locomotive No. 4014

Railroad Plans to Restore One of the Largest Steam Locomotives Ever Built

Read by: ED KE4JWS

Omaha, Neb., July 23, 2013 – Union Pacific Railroad today announced it reached an agreement with the Southern California Chapter – Railway & Locomotive Historical Society in Pomona, Calif., to transfer ownership of one of the world’s largest steam locomotives, Big Boy No. 4014, back to Union Pacific.

Read by: MARTHA KJ4RIQ

Union Pacific plans to relocate No. 4014 to Cheyenne, Wyo., where Union Pacific’s Heritage Fleet Operations team will work to restore it to operating condition. Details regarding those efforts will be made public at a later date.

Union Pacific donated No. 4014 to the historical society December 7, 1961. The locomotive arrived January 8, 1962, at its current display location at the Rail Giants Train Museum in Pomona.

No other railroad has retained its historical equipment or honored its American roots like Union Pacific.

“Our steam locomotive program is a source of great pride to Union Pacific employees past and present,” said Ed Dickens, senior manager – Union Pacific Heritage Operations. “We are very excited about the opportunity to bring history to life by restoring No. 4014.”

About Union Pacific

Read by: NICKI KF4DHK

Union Pacific Railroad is the principal operating company of Union Pacific Corporation (NYSE: UNP). One of America’s most recognized companies, Union Pacific Railroad links 23 states in the western two-thirds of the country by rail, providing a critical link in the global supply chain. From 2007-2012, Union Pacific invested $18 billion in its network and operations to support America’s transportation infrastructure, including a record $3.7 billion in 2012. The railroad’s diversified business mix includes Agricultural Products, Automotive, Chemicals, Coal, Industrial Products and Intermodal. Union Pacific serves many of the fastest-growing U.S. population centers, operates from all major West Coast and Gulf Coast ports to eastern gateways, connects with Canada’s rail systems and is the only railroad serving all six major Mexico gateways. Union Pacific provides value to its roughly 10,000 customers by delivering products in a safe, reliable, fuel-efficient and environmentally responsible manner.

Read by: PAUL KJ4WQN

It has been an unusual summer. I don’t recall seeing a June or July where there was so much rain recorded. In fact, some locations have seen near record rainfall for the period. It appears the pattern will continue into August with regular rain events followed by normal to below normal temperatures. Business is booming for grass cutting operations. The rainfall has contributed a very green landscape with a nearly constant sound of lawn mowers buzzing around neighborhoods…especially mine. In some cases, it has been difficult for farmers to get into the fields which could threaten the harvest in some parts of the country. Another result of the excessive rainfall will be what should be a brilliant fall color display once the leaves start changing. A recent push of autumn like air from the Midwest to the East and part of the South has some folks wondering if the sun has given up it’s last stretch of summer heat. It is still the first part of August and I would expect to see a few more 90 degree days. But it isn’t looking too likely at this time. Regardless of how temperatures behave, summer does not officially end until Sept. 22. Meteorological summer comes to a close in early September, and solar summer winds down in early August. One thing seems certain, Kentucky can probably expect to see a continuation of the wet and mild conditions into August. There are some indications of a bigger cool down after mid month. But that is too far out to be certain of anything.

Things are popping in Space Weather as well…Earth is entering a stream of debris from Comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle, source of the annual Perseid meteor shower. Forecasters expect the shower to peak on August 12-14 when Earth moves through the densest part of the debris stream. However, the first Perseid fireballs are arriving now. A fireball is a meteor brighter than Jupiter or Venus. There have been a few reports across Kentucky of residents seeing the fireballs. New research from NASA’s Meteoroid Environment Office shows that the Perseids produce more fireballs than any other annual meteor shower. That means the nights ahead could be sprinkled with bright flashes. Meteor rates should remain low for the next few days as Earth penetrates the sparse outskirts of the debris stream. But by August 12 – 13th, up to 100 meteors per hour may be seen.

Preparedness Update

You may be surprised at some of the household items which can be used for a variety of emergency situations. The secret weapon in my Bug out Bag is pantyhose…er, maybe I should call them Man-tyhose. But after you stop laughing… you might want to read on to see just WHY I keep these in my pack…

You may just find yourself grabbing a few pairs afterwards.

If you are heading out for a weekend camping trip or a disaster is on its way and you need to hoof it on foot to get out of dodge, make sure you always have a few pair of these in your gear…

It might not be a very manly thing to carry and I get a few funny looks when I step up to the counter at Wal Mart with a pair of pantyhose… but this is survival planning and… you looking manly is trumped by the benefit of being prepared. Not only are these cheap to buy but there are dozens of alternative uses for them and they take up practically no space.

Check out the list below for a small sampling of what Pantyhose can be used for:

  • You can wear pantyhose as extra layer beneath your normal clothes to keep warm in cold weather.
  • Use pantyhose to prevent bites and stings.
  • Wear pantyhose under your shorts or pants to protect against chiggers, ticks, and other biting insects.
  • If you are going to be trekking through water, wear them to protect yourself from jellyfish stings and leaches.
  • Stretch a pair of pantyhose over a “Y” shaped branch or stick and use as a skimmer or a fishing net.
  • You won’t catch a 10lb catfish in this, but you may be able to pick up a few smaller fish to eat or use as bait.
  • Use pantyhose to secure bait while fishing. Place bait in the pantyhose and secure it to a tree or anything sturdy in order to to keep from losing bait while fishing.
  • Use pantyhose as a pouch or bag to carry things.
  • Use pantyhose to fasten or bind things together instead of twine or bungee cords.
  • You can use pantyhose as a belt to keep your pants hiked up.
  • In first aid, you can utilize pantyhose as a tourniquet or to hold and/or secure a bandage or hot and cold pack.
  • Use pantyhose as a first round filter to strain any collected water. The water will still need to be treated or boiled but this first line of defense will help to clear the water of any large particles.
  • Use pantyhose to prevent blisters. Cut the feet off of a pair of pantyhose at the ankles and wear them under your socks. They will help cut down on the friction between your shoe and your foot, thus reducing the risk of blisters.

I’m not saying that these should be worn on a regular basis, but in a survival situation the benefit of having those in your pack outweigh any blow that your pride may take when purchasing them. And if you really can’t break down and buy a pair of them for yourself, I’ve actually seen a few places that sell them in camouflage for the real manly man. Or if you have the extra cash you can always buy Underarmour, but when you can get 10 pair of pantyhose for the cost of 1 pair of Underarmour, I would rather save my money for something else. These are just a few examples of what a little ingenuity can bring you in a survival situation.

David Powell
Weather Coordinator
Christian County Emergency Management

2 Comments

Filed under Information Net

2 responses to “Information Net for August 12

  1. Tomlinsonk70

    i have just got my first radio and need some assistance. need my FCC licensing and operating directions. any help please. Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Note™, an AT&T LTE smartphone

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